Bode

As I’ve written about in my previous posts on Starch Slides and Hôtel, I am always thrilled to come across a company that is conscious about their production without detracting from their aesthetic goals—even better when it actually contributes to them.  In order for more responsible modes of consumer culture to catch on, they have to be desirable, not a lesser alternative.  Whenever I find someone who is filling that need, I want to celebrate it!  

A workwear jacket constructed from an antique French tapestry.  From  Tres Bien , one of Bode's stockists.

A workwear jacket constructed from an antique French tapestry.  From Tres Bien, one of Bode's stockists.

Emily Adams Bode’s eponymous line, Bode, has so many aspects to get excited about that it’s hard to know where to begin: the celebration of traditional women’s craft?  The ingenious repurposing of vintage fabrics? The fact that each piece is one-of-a-kind and handmade with care in New York? The gender-bending attitude and styling? It’s all compelling, even more so when Bode speaks about her conceptual inspirations, but what I find most important is that you could not know any of this and still fall in love with the clothes themselves (especially as they’re presented in Bode’s artistic lookbooks).

Images of Emily Adams Bode in her work space from Surface Magazine.

Images of Emily Adams Bode in her work space from Surface Magazine.

Bode at her F/W '17 Presentation.  From  Male Fashion Trends .

Bode at her F/W '17 Presentation.  From Male Fashion Trends.

From Bode's S/S '18 Lookbook.

From Bode's S/S '18 Lookbook.

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Image from Bode's F/W '18 Lookbook.

Image from Bode's F/W '18 Lookbook.

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It’s very inspiring to see a designer both play into aspects of the high fashion world, i.e. a formal presentation at Men’s Fashion Week, and apply discretion to eschew the rules that aren’t suited to the goals of the line, i.e. not creating samples or using professional models.

As the line grows, the team is replicating more fabrics for wholesalers, but Bode affirms that she’ll “never not do the one-of-a-kind stuff” (source: Vogue).

More images from the F/W '17 presentation.

More images from the F/W '17 presentation.

Shirts currently for sale from  Bode .  Left: made from a 1950s tablecloth Right: made from 1950s dead-stock yardage.

Shirts currently for sale from Bode.  Left: made from a 1950s tablecloth Right: made from 1950s dead-stock yardage.

Patchwork quilt shirts currently for sale from Bode.  Left: made from a pre-1940s anvil quilt,  popular in the 1890s to celebrate a common tool of the trades at the time.  Right: made from late 1800s calico and stripe quilt top fabric.

Patchwork quilt shirts currently for sale from Bode.  Left: made from a pre-1940s anvil quilt,  popular in the 1890s to celebrate a common tool of the trades at the time.  Right: made from late 1800s calico and stripe quilt top fabric.

Workwear jackets constructed from terry cloth toweling work from the 1960-70s. 

Workwear jackets constructed from terry cloth toweling work from the 1960-70s. 

Leon Bridges in a Bode jacket, styled by Mac Huelster.

Leon Bridges in a Bode jacket, styled by Mac Huelster.